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Do you love good writing? So do we. If you have a short story, poem, essay or book review, we’d love to hear from you. We read and consider submissions on an anonymous basis, so it’s a level playing ground for everyone - whether you’re new to writing or an old hand. We've had a great response so far, but don't worry, there's plenty of room for new writing at Brain drip.

Submit to Brain drip here.

We’re aiming to get off the beaten track - aiming to travel new ground in developing an online Australian literary magazine, which is free to read and free to submit to. We want to provide a forum for writers to be published, without barriers like paid subscriptions or needing to be an established writer. And for readers, you can catch up on the best new Australian writing right here, for free.

There’s nothing better to get you through the week than a good story... one you can’t put down. So pretty soon we'll be publishing new pieces weekly. In the meantime, we’d love to read your story.

Brain drip is a place for your stories to come and be shared.

Share this and help promote amazing Aussie writing.

About the author:

Rob Duplock

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Rob Duplock is the managing editor of Brain drip. When he's not working on this here lit mag or working 9-5 as a web developer, he enjoys reading, writing and arithmetic - in that order.

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A Short-Lived Marriage

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On entering his apartment Rob could hear the sound of the television. Coming down the hall he noticed cardboard boxes sealed in duck tape with “Arthur’s clothes and books” written across them in scribbled black text. Arthur sat in the living room, despondent. The light coming from the television broke the darkness at intervals with iridescent flashes. Rob passed into the kitchen. 

I thought you'd be different

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In the dim light of the stairwell Olivia couldn’t make out just where she was. There was an amber gloom as the afternoon sunlight seeped through the orange glass side panels around the front door. Robert groped for one of those push-button light switches that leaves the bulb on for a couple of minutes. He said that his place was on the first floor. He grabbed her hand and cried, “Come on!” This was the first time that Olivia had been to his place, though he’d stayed over at hers a few times since they’d started going out. The rather musty air of the stairs persisted on the landing.